Online Resources Can Do Library
Coping with MS: Using Rehabilitation to Enhance Resilence

By: Rosalind Kalb, PhD & Mandy Rohrig, PT, DPT

Multiple sclerosis often involves “stormy” periods that can rattle the foundations for you and your family members. The “storms” or challenges of MS may include adapting to the diagnosis, changes in functional abilities and the use of new or different adaptive devices, among other obstacles. Or, it may involve daily challenges such as driving independently or overcoming a fatiguing day of work. During such challenging times, you and your loved ones may feel down, exhausted and defeated. Learning to cope effectively with these obstacles helps strengthen and prepare you to meet future challenges. In other words, successful coping helps increase your resilience.

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Unique Approaches to Unique MS Symptoms

By: Patty Bobryk, MHS, PT, MSCS, ATP

Have you ever wondered if there was a novel approach to manage one or more of your MS symptoms? Adequate symptom management is key to living well with your MS. There are a variety of approaches to managing your symptoms: prescription and over the counter medications, complementary and alternative medicine, rehabilitation, and other self-help strategies. In this article we are going to explore a few unique ways to manage some of the unique symptoms you may be experiencing.

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The ABC’s & XYZ’s of Daily Living with MS

By: Denise Nowack, RD & Ann Mullinix, OTR/L

Managing your MS is more than making doctor appointments, taking medications and using your energy to perform the activities that “should be done”. Making time for the activities that bring joy and fulfillment are important to improve health and overall well-being. Finding solutions that help you reclaim the things you love and enhance the manageability of everyday life can be easy as ABC.

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Managing Multiple Sclerosis Early

By: Deborah M. Miller, PhD, LISW & Linda Walls, OTR

Learning how to manage the physical changes you may experience as a newly diagnosed person living with MS can be a major challenge.

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Keeping Your Relationship Alive: The Physical & Emotional Aspects of Intimacy in MS

By: Pat Kennedy, RN, CNP, MSCN & Rosalind Kalb, PhD

‘Intimacy’ isn’t just about sexual feelings and sexual activity – although that’s one important part we’ll talk about later. Intimacy is about effective communication, trust and respect, shared values and expectations, and a balanced give-and take. Maintaining intimacy can be difficult in any relationship, but the stresses of MS – its unpredictability, progressive nature, complex symptoms and financial impact – can challenge any couple. Feelings of loss, anxiety, anger and guilt can interfere with communication, connection and effective problem-solving; physical changes can interfere with everyday activities and sexual intimacy. So where to begin?

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Keeping Fit with Multiple Sclerosis

By: Alexander Ng, PhD, FACSM & Tammy G. Roehrs, PT, MA, NCS

Fitness is often associated with exercise. While exercise or physical activity is now advised for everyone, having MS can make meeting recommended exercise guidelines challenging. But is it really that important if someone has a chronic disease like MS? The short answer is. . . YES! Lack of exercise is associated with heart disease, cancers, metabolic diseases, hypertension, low bone density, all-cause mortality, and numerous other health risks that affect people with MS. The latest catch phrase about exercise, “Exercise is Medicine,” implies that physical activity is just as important for someone with MS as it is for the general population.

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Effective Parenting: Balancing Family and MS

By: Peggy Crawford, PhD

The demands of either MS or parenting can be challenging, but when experienced together, it is not unusual for people to feel stressed and overwhelmed. Add to this, unpredictable and fluctuating MS symptoms that can interfere with fun activities and make it difficult to carry out your daily responsibilities (even disciplining your children). The good news is that there is a lot you can do to limit the impact of your symptoms on your life and the lives of people you love.

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Travel Tips with Multiple Sclerosis

By: Juliann Hanson-Zlatev, OTR & Amanda Rohrig, PT, DPT

The spring/summer travel season is fast approaching!! What are your plans? Perhaps attending a family reunion, dipping your toes in the surf and sand, or traveling to that “bucket list” location you have so long wanted to enjoy are your summer travel goals? Maybe you just want to relax and “get away from it all” with the family, or use up your well-earned vacation time from work? Wait no longer…..you CAN travel. With a little knowledge, preparation and planning, your travel aspirations can become a reality.

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Get Motivated to Get Organized

By: Juliann Hanson-Zlatev, OTR & David Rintell, EdD

There are few things as discouraging as feeling like you cannot keep up with your daily life and the mountain of “stuff” you have to do. These days, people live busy lives, and people living with MS have even more to organize – such as appointments, paperwork, medication schedules, to name a few. On top of that, MS fatigue can make it even more difficult to keep up. The good news is - there are many ways to become more organized and become more productive!

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Flying Solo with Multiple Sclerosis

By: Peggy Crawford, PhD & Linda Walls, OTR

Some people with MS fly solo by choice, some by circumstance and others for a combination of reasons. In whichever ways people find themselves flying solo with MS, it seems to help if they view this unanticipated life event as a series of challenges (rather than threats). MS provides opportunities (and a kick in the butt) to pursue a healthier lifestyle, plan ahead and exercise more control over various aspects of life. Coping with MS in these proactive ways helps people maintain greater independence. During this process, many people discover strengths and abilities they didn’t know they had or they under appreciated.

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